Sol Levine Lectureship on Society and Health-“The Risks of Communicating Genetic Risks: Three Fallacies and a Challenge”

Sol Levine Lectureship on Society and Health-
“The Risks of Communicating Genetic Risks: Three Fallacies and a Challenge”

Lecturer: Theresa Marteau, PhD, Kings College, London
Date: Monday, October 19th, 2009
Location: BU School of Public Health, BU Medical Campus, 88 E Newton St.
Time: 4:00 p.m. Reception, Evans Seminar Room,
5:00 p.m. Lecture, Keefer Auditorium

On October 19th, join Theresa Marteau, PhD, as she presents the annual Sol Levine Lectureship on Society and Health. Her lecture, “The Risks of Communicating Genetic Risks: Three Fallacies and a Challenge,” will address common misconceptions about the consequences of communicating genetic risks to individuals, including the idea that such information will cause long-term emotional distress, induce a sense of fatalism or motivate behavior change.

Theresa Marteau

Marteau is a professor of health psychology at King’s College, London. Her research focuses on emotional, cognitive and behavioral responses to health risk information, organized around two broad themes: risk communication and behavior, and informed choice and behavior.

The Sol Levine Lectureship on Society and Health commemorates Sol Levine who was a medical sociologist. The three Boston institutions where he served as a faculty member – BU School of Public Health, Harvard School of Public Health and the Health Institute at Tufts-New England Medical Center – established the annual lectureship in his name.

This event is co-sponsored by BUSPH, Harvard and Tufts.

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